Because even on a first date I’m bound to blow my nose every now and then, I often end up talking about PCD pretty early on, in order to explain that I don’t have some sort of (potentially infectious) cold or other lurgy

When you start a new relationship it is difficult to know when to tell your new partner about PCD.  Although you may have reasons for not telling your new partner at an early stage about your health condition it is also important that you continue to see your health as priority and don’t neglect your physiotherapy routine.

Sometimes having PCD can be difficult as when you get a chest infection you don’t have the energy to socialise and you may have to change plans.  The changing of plans last minute can put added stress on relationships and it can be difficult for partners to accept that your health might have to take precedence to going out. However most people try not to let PCD get in the way of a ‘normal’ life and the compromise is often to make the best of the times when you are well, whilst being kind to yourself when you aren’t.

As for all people it is important to use barrier contraception to prevent contracting sexually transmitted diseases.

If you are a lady and take oral contraceptives you must remember that short term courses of oral or intravenous antibiotics can affect some oral contraceptive methods by changing how well they are absorbed into your body.  During these times you should use a condom throughout the course of antibiotics and for seven days after.

Long term antibiotics used in PCD (e.g azithromycin, flucloxacillin) will not affect your contraceptive if you have been on them for a prolonged period, although you will need additional protection for a short period when starting these antibiotics for the first time.

Antibiotics, such as rifampicin, used to treat TB and related bacteria (called mycobacterium) can affect most methods of contraception, including the Depo-Provera injection and Implanon, so take further advice if this applies to you.

Case Study